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Colonel Isabelle Ehrhart-Duffo (French Army)
Gender Advisor to SACT

Lieutenant Colonel Michele Claveau (Canadian Air Force)
Deputy Gender Advisor

Ms. Aram Hong (Canadian Contractor)
Gender Advisor Assistant

For information please contact: genderadvisor@act.nato.int or via telephone at +1 (757) 747-3400

Resources

Greater action needed to include women in peacekeeping – UN study

femme_en_ops8 February 2011

Ten years after the Security Council called for greater involvement of women in peacebuilding, United Nations peacekeeping missions have a mixed record and need to deploy greater efforts to reach the goal, according to a study launched today. “The impact study is a call to action to the senior leadership of peacekeeping to accelerate implementation of resolution 1325,” UN Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations Alain Le Roy said, referring to the Council’s resolution of October 2000, which sought to end sexual violence against women and girls in armed conflict and encourage greater participation by them in peacebuilding initiatives.

The study, carried out by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) and the Department of Field Support (DFS), calls on UN peacekeeping missions to work with local women, national authorities and Member States to increase the limited participation of women in peace negotiations, national security institutions and governance in post-conflict situations today.

Despite some cases of enhanced political representation, women’s ability to contribute effectively to governing their societies often remains hampered by persistent discrimination, it reported. Early and better-coordinated planning by peacekeeping missions, across the UN system and with national partners, is required to ensure lasting and meaningful changes for women in post-conflict situations, it added.

“I will continue to prioritize this agenda and provide the necessary leadership to ensure that the entire peacekeeping family is effectively mobilized to support the building of more just and equal post-conflict societies,” Mr. Le Roy said in launching the Ten-year Impact Study on Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) on Women, Peace and Security in Peacekeeping.

Peacekeeping has played a crucial role in significant progress made in women’s participation in politics as voters, candidates and elected officials, with the most marked advances in countries where quotas are in place, such as Timor-Leste and Burundi, it reported.

Peacekeeping missions have also influenced legal and judicial reforms by supporting the adoption of gender equality laws in several countries, including the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Sierra Leone. Deployments of patrols in high-risk areas in the Darfur region of Sudan and the DRC have also enhanced protection of women.

But peacekeeping has not succeeded in significantly improving women’s participation in peace negotiations, the study found, underscoring the need for a strategy ensuring engagement with diverse groups of women. Peacekeeping missions should also intensify advocacy to increase the representation of women in national security institutions, safeguard their equal rights, and expand opportunities for their professional advancement, it added.

The study also called for a more robust response to fight against conflict-related sexual violence, which remains highly prevalent in peacekeeping mission areas; more resources for protecting women who are refugees or internally displaced, with the support of international partners; and holding senior peacekeeping management to a higher level of accountability for compliance with resolution 1325.

Key advances include an exponential increase in women serving as civilian staff in UN peacekeeping missions from only 20 in the 32 years between 1957 and 1989 to 30 per cent of the current 19,800 civilian staffers. Eight Special Representatives of the Secretary-General (SRSGs) and Deputy SRSGs in peace operations are women, while women currently make up nine per cent of the 12,000 deployed police officers, up from six per cent in 2005.

There are now three all-female UN police units deployed – Indian in Liberia, Bangladeshi in Haiti, and Samoan in Timor-Leste – and the current UN Police Adviser, who advises the DPKO on police-related matters, is a woman, Ann-Marie Orler of Sweden.

The UN has launched a plan to recruit more female police officers into national police services and into UN police operations around the world, with a goal of reaching 20 per cent by 2014.

References

National Action Plans Timeline

31 October 2000
UNSCR 1325
June 2005 (revised 2008)
Denmark ~ Action Plan for the Implementation of UNSCR 1325
Norway ~ Norwegian Government’s Action Plan for the Implementation of UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security
October 2006 (Revised 2009)
Sweden ~ Swedish Government’s Action Plan to Implement Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) on Women, Peace and Security
January 2007
Cote d’Ivoire ~ National Action Plan for the Implementation of UNSCR 1325
February 2007 (revised October 2010)
Switzerland ~ National Action Plan for the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) on Women, Peace and Security
8 August 2007
Austria ~ National Action Plan on Implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000)
November 2007

Spain ~ Government of Spain’s Action Plan for the Application of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) On Women, Peace and Security

December 2007
Netherlands ~ Dutch National Action Plan on Resolution 1325
December 2011
Second NAP ~ Women: Powerful Agents for Peace and Security. Dutch National Action Plan (2012-2015)
8 March 2008
Iceland ~ Women, Peace and Security: Iceland’s Plan of Action for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000)
19 June 2008
UNSCR 1820
19 September 2008
Finland ~ UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) “Women, Peace and Security” Finland’s National Action Plan 2008-2011
December 2008
Uganda ~ Uganda Action Plan on UN Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820 and the Goma Declaration
8 March 2009
Liberia ~ Liberia National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Resolution 1325
8 May 2009
Belgium ~ Women, Peace and Security: Belgian National Action Plan on the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325
August 2009
Portugal ~ National Action Plan for the Implementation of UNSC Resolution 1325 (2000) about Women, Peace and Security (2009-2013)
3 August 2009
Chile ~ National Action Plan for the Implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325/2000 ‘Women, Security and Peace
30 September 2009
UNSCR 1888
5 October 2009
UNSCR 1889
March 2010
Sierra Leone ~ The Sierra Leone National Action Plan for the Full Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1325 (2000) and 1820 (2008)
March 2010
The Philippines ~ The Philippine National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security
March 2010
Guinea-Bissau ~National Action Plan on UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (please note: this NAP exists only in original Portuguese, there are currently no available translations)
May 2010
Rwanda ~ National Action Plan 2009-2012: The United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325/2000 on Women, Peace and Security
June 2010
Cote d’Ivoire ~ National Action Plan for the Implementation of Resolution 1325 of the Security Council (2008-2012)
July 2010
Bosnia-Herzegovina ~ Action Plan for the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2010-2013) (please note: this NAP exists only in original Bosnian, there are currently no available translations)
October 2010
Canada’s Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions on Women, Peace and Security
November 2010
France ~ Implementation of the “Women, Peace and Security” Resolutions of the United Nations Security Council
November 2010
Estonia ~ Estonia’s Action Plan for the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 “Women, Peace and Security” in Estonia 2010-2014
16 December 2010
UNSCR 1960
23 December 2010

Italy ~ National Action Plan of Italy on “Women, Peace and Security” 2010-2013

2011
Croatia ~ National Action Plan for the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) on Women, Peace and Security, and Related Resolutions (for the period from 2011 to 2014)
2011
Serbia ~ United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 in Serbia on Women, Peace and Security
1 February 2011
Nepal ~ National Action Plan on Implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1325 and 1820 (2011/12-2015/16)
May 2011
Senegal ~ Plan d’Action National Mise en Œuvre au Senegal de la Résolution 1325 (2000) du Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies (please note: this NAP exists only in original French, there are currently no available translations)
July 2011
Slovenia ~ Action Plan for the Republic of Slovenia for the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolutions No. 1325 and 1820 on Women, Peace and Security for the period of 2010-2015
July 2011
Guinea ~ Plan National d’Action Stratégique Pour la Mise en Œuvre des Résolutions 1325 et 1820 du Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies (2009-2013)
August 2011
Burundi National Action Plan on Security Council Resolution 1325 and 1830 (link not available)
November 2011 (revised February 2012)
United Kingdom ~ UK Government National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325 Women, Peace and Security
25 November 2011
Ireland ~ Ireland’s National Action Plan for Implementation of UNSCR 1325, 2011-2014
December 2011
United States of America ~ United States National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security
27 December 2011
Georgia ~ 2012-2015 Georgian National Action Plan for the Implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on “Women, Peace and Security” (1820, 1888, 1889 and 1960)
March 2012

Australia ~ Australian National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security 2012-2018

 


United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 (2000) (annotated version can be found here)

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1820 (2008)

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1888 (2009)

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1889 (2010)

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1960 (2010)

*** Should the above links not work, you can access the UN Security Resolutions repository here. ***

NATO/EAPC Policy on Integrating UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security, 10 Dec 2007 & Comprehensive Report on Implementation of the Policy, 8 Sep 2010

Bi-SC Directive 40-1, Integrating UNSCR 1325 and Gender Perspectives in the NATO Command Structure Including Measures for Protection During Armed Conflict, 2 Sep 2009

HQ SACT Gender Perspective Recommendations, 18 May 10 (Passed silence 2 Aug 2010)

NATO Action Plan on Mainstreaming UNSCR 1325 into NATO-Led Operations and Missions, 17 Nov 2010

NATO Committee on Gender Perspectives

Gender Balance and Diversity in NATO

Lisbon Summit Declaration, paragraph 7, 20 Nov 2010

Chicago Summit Declaration, paragraph 16, 21 May 2012


Useful Links and Resources

DCAF Gender and SSR Toolkit

DCAF Gender and SSR Training Resource Package

NATO Committee on Gender Perspectives (NCGP)

UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations - Department of Field Support | Guidelines on Integrating Gender Perspective

PeaceWomen - Women's International League for Peace and Freedom

UN Women | United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women

UN Women | Analytical Inventory of Peacekeeping Practice

Civil-Military Co-operation Centre of Excellence

Swedish Armed Forces International Centre - SWEDINT

Nordic Centre for Gender in Military Operations (Sweden)

Kvinna till Kvinna | Good and Bad Examples - Lessons Learned UNSCR 1325

Implementing UNSCR 1325 & Integrating Gender Perspective

linda_johansson25 March 11

HQ SACT’s Two-Pronged Approach:

  1. Implementing UNSCR 1325
    • UNSCR 1325 calls attention to the disproportionate impact that armed conflict has on women and children and recommends specific measures to remedy this.
  2. Integrating Gender Perspective
    • Gender refers to the social attributes and opportunities associated with being male and female. It goes beyond the sex of the person to include how relationships are socially constructed. Gender is heavily influenced by one’s culture.
    • Gender Perspective is integrated when issues are examined from the point of view of both men and women to identify differences in needs and priorities, as well as in abilities and potential.

HQ SACT Gender Perspective Recommendations: Our Roadmap

  1. Inclusion in curriculum at NATO Education and Training Facilities, COE’s and NATO and Partner Countries National Military Education and Training Institutions and Partner Training Centre
  2. Gender Awareness ADL module as standard pre-deployment training
  3. ADL course for personnel working in the field of Gender to support operations
  4. Inclusion in curriculum for civilian pre-deployment training in Vyskov, Czech Republic
  5. Completed accreditation process for existing training courses in the field of gender.
  6. A SACT-approved “Roadmap on Implementing UNSCR 1325 and Integrating Gender Perspective”
  7. Gender Advisor post within the revised PE 2012 structure
  8. Integration of gender perspective in HQ SACT work on the Comprehensive Approach.
  9. Electronic repository for gender-related issues , specifically AARs and Best Practices from ops
  10. Evaluation of establishing a Gender Awareness Centre of Excellence (CoE).
  11. Unclassified website on gender-related activities fully accessible to all
  12. Increased awareness of UNSCR 1325 and gender-related issues throughout ACT
  13. Increased gender perspective (specifically women's representation) within NATO and in decision making bodies at all levels of the planning process.

NATO Action Plan

Based on the Six Tracks of the NATO/EAPC Policy:

  1. Mainstreaming in policies, programmes and documentation
  2. Cooperation with International Organizations and civil society
  3. Education and training (ACT)
  4. Operations
  5. Public Diplomacy
  6. National Initiatives

The NATO Action Plan aims to “mainstream gender” into all areas related to current and future planning and conduct of operations. Four focus areas:

  1. Crisis Management, Operational Planning and Execution
  2. Training and Education for Operational Aspects
  3. Operational execution
  4. Reports and Reporting Systems

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